Barbi Kaplan-Frenkel, DO

Barbi Kaplan-Frenkel, DO

Dr. Kaplan-Frenkel was born in Bronx, New York and grew up on Long Island. She attended New York College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed a residency at Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, New York and a fellowship at Booth Memorial Medical Center/New York University. Dr. Kaplan-Frenkel was inspired to enter the medical field by her uncle who was a distinguished family physician, educator and hospital administrator. His gentle approach and commitment to putting patients first has stuck with her throughout her career.

After her time working in medicine, Dr. Kaplan-Frenkel hopes to retire to Israel.

“My commitment is to provide you with the information you need to be an active decision maker in your care, as well as to assure the highest quality of treatment available.”

Services:

  • Treatment of all cancer types
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) trial participant

Medical School:

  • New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury, New York

Residency:

  • Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York

Fellowship:

  • Brachytherapy: Booth Memorial Medical Center/New York University, New York

Board Certification:

  • Radiation Oncology

Distinctions:

  • Special interest in breast and prostate malignancies
  • American College of Radiology practice accreditation surveyor
  • Principal Investigator: radiation oncology clinical research
  • Married, mother of three
  • Enjoys biking and cooking

Style of Practice:

Dr. Kaplan-Frenkel’s patients can expect her to be open, caring and positive. She values being part of a team that is committed to both excellence and compassion.
KEY TRAITS: Caring, direct, passionate

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